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LISTENING – LEARNING – RESEARCH & ANALYSIS – PEACE HISTORY

PLACES: MYANMAR – PHILIPPINES – MINDANAO – MANIPURNEPALINDIASRI LANKA – TIMOR LESTE – VIETNAM

Below are all the CPCS publications and research papers in chronological order. Please use the Search function, the tag cloud on the right or the category links above for more refined browsing.


Peace is Living with Dignity: Voices of Communities from Myanmar’s Ceasefire Areas in 2016

Author: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Published by: CPCS
Publication Date: January 2016
ISBN: 13:978 99963 856 4 3

Peace is Living with Dignity showcases the second round of CPCS’ project listening to communities and their experiences with the peace process in Myanmar. Utilising CPCS Listening Methodology, the project aims to amplify the voices of people in ceasefire areas of Myanmar to inform and influence decision-makers in the peace process. Engaging communities in the same six states (Kachin, Northern Shan, Southern Shan, Kayah, Kayin, and Mon States) as the first round, this publication presents the opinions and experiences of community members with the on-going peace process, their daily challenges, and their hopes for the future based on 459 conversations with 1,663 participants in 2016.

The publication is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1 contains the introduction and conflict context, as well as the summary of main findings across all of the states. The chapter also covers comparison between the first round of the project in 2015 and the second in 2016. Chapter 2 outlines recommendations based on the findings for key stakeholders. Chapter 3 explains listening methodology and how it was used to gather the data. Chapter 4 contains the experiences and reflections of the listeners that conducted the conversations with community members of each community. Finally, Chapters 5 to 10 are devoted to in-depth discussions of the main themes identified in the six areas covered by the research.


A Homegrown Approach to Accompaniment in the Face of Violence: IFI’s Lumad Accompaniment Program in Mindanao

Author: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Published by: CPCS
Publication date: December 2016
ISBN: N/A

A Homegrown Approach to Accompaniment in the Face of Violence: IFI’s Lumad Accompaniment Program in Mindanao is a CPCS Learning Paper focused on the Lumad Accompaniment Program in Mindanao in the Philippines. A component of the Mindanao Lumad Ministry, the Lumad Accompaniment Program was initiated by Mindanao Bishops Conference at a consultation meeting on the Lumad situation in November 2015. The bishops had convened to discuss and formulate a collective response to “ongoing and worsening human rights violations perpetuated by structural violence” against Lumad peoples.

This paper analyses the key features of the program and discusses some significant challenges for the program in the context of the Lumad community where the pilot accompaniment program was conducted. This paper covers events up to early October 2016. The remarkable speed of implementation and early success of the Lumad Accompaniment Program and the role of the programme within the broader framework of ministry towards Lumad peoples make it an interesting subject of study in community security. That the Lumad Accompaniment Program is a homegrown, domestic and civilian intervention presents further points of interest in the contemplation of the relative impact between insiders and outsiders in peacebuilding.


The Soldier, Above All Others, Prays for Peace: An analysis of the Myanmar armed forces in an era of transition

Author: Sarah L. Clarke
Published by: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Publication date: December 2016
ISBN: N/A

The Soldier, Above All Others, Prays for Peace: An analysis of the Myanmar armed forces in an era of transition seeks to provide an analysis of the Myanmar armed forces, the Tatmadaw, and, guided by this analysis, to consider a range of strategies and approaches for engagement available to both Myanmar actors and actors engaging in Myanmar from the regional and international levels. The Tatmadaw is one of the key protagonists on the Myanmar stage and in the country’s peace process about which we know the least. It is an institution that has maintained firm control over all politics in the country from 1962 onwards. Today, it remains autonomous in its purview over security issues, and as an actor that has long played a major role in economic affairs, the Tatmadaw is not only central to peacemaking efforts, it also holds a unique position in relation to longer term peacebuilding endeavours in Myanmar. Yet, as an institution, the Tatmadaw remains inaccessible and opaque. Many stakeholders in Myanmar’s current transition find themselves highly constrained in their access to, engagement with, and analysis of this central player. As such, this paper aims to provide a deeper understanding of how the armed forces fits as a central part of the Myanmar puzzle, and the interests and concerns that have, thus far, steered and justified the Tatmadaw’s role in Myanmar politics.


The Value of Listening to Community Voices: A Peacebuilding Approach to Armed Social ViolenceThe Value of Listening to Community Voices: A Peacebuilding Approach to Armed Social Violence

Author: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Published by: The Berghof Foundation
Publication date: October 2016
ISBN: N/A

In an article entitled The Value of Listening to Community Voices: A Peacebuilding Approach to Armed Social Violence, CPCS contributes to the Berghof Handbook Dialogue No. 12, which explores the merits of applying peacebuilding approaches to address armed social violence.

The article proposes using Listening Methodology, a conflict transformation research methodology that CPCS uses to better appreciate conflict dynamics and measure the effectiveness of interventions aimed at addressing not only of the manifestations but also the structural causes of violence. Listening Methodology seeks to listen and amplify the voices of communities directly affected by violent conflict. This is based on the understanding that those directly affected by violent conflict often have key insights that need to be considered to design effective, context-sensitive policies and interventions. This is particularly relevant given that one of the drivers of both political and armed social violence often is grievance due to marginalization, which can be addressed by providing spaces for those often ignored to express their frustrations.


For Building Relationships Across Divides: Peace and Conflict Analysis of Kachin State, 2016

Building Relationships Across Divides: Peace and Conflict Analysis of Kachin State, 2016

Author: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Published by: CPCS
Publication date: October 2016
ISBN: N/A

Building Relationships Across Divides: Peace and Conflict Analysis of Kachin State, 2016 is an analysis of conflict in Kachin State since 2011, after the ceasefire signed in 1994 between the Central Government and the Kachin Independence Organisation (KIO) broke down. This analysis applies systems thinking to the conflict in Kachin State and presents a community perspective of the present conflict situation, as well as opportunities for peace, based on and informed by a series of conversations with community leaders in Myitkyina, the state capital. As a result, several key driving factors that shape the conflict are mapped as systems that illustrate the Kachin State conflict. Furthermore, leverage points for interventions are illustrated in order to emphasise the relationships between different dynamics of the Kachin State conflict and to encourage intervention that is meaningful, sustainable, amplifies factors for peace, and renews relationships and trust between those involved and affected by conflict in Kachin State.

Peace is for Everyone FINAL 5.5.16 WEB-page-001Peace is for Everyone: Bangsamoro stories of hope, survival, pain and resilience

Author: Institute of Bangsamoro Studies (IBS)
Published by: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Publication date: June 2016
ISBN: 13:978-9924-9044-0-3

This publication presents the stories of almost 300 ordinary Bangsamoro men and women in the provinces of Maguindanao, Cotabato Province, Sultan Kudarat, Lanao del Sur, Lanao del Norte, Zamboanga Sibugay, Zamboanga del Sur, Basilan, Sulu and Tawi-Tawi, and the cities of Marawi, Iligan, Cotabato and Isabela. These men and women shared their experiences regarding the last decades of conflict in Southern Philippines throughout 2015, and voice their hopes for a peaceful, better and more harmonious future.

Peace is for Everyone uses a Peace History approach to explore the intersections between personal experiences and collective accounts. By weaving together a diverse range of individual stories, opinions and sentiments, the book presents a complex, nuanced, rich description of the situation on Mindanao following the signing of the peace agreement between the MILF and the Government of the Philippines in 2014.


small cover HOW DO YOU SOLVE A PROBLEM LIKE THE GPH-NDFP PEACE PROCESS - COVER copyHow do you solve a problem like the GPH-NDFP Peace Process? Paradigm shifts for 2016 and beyond
Author: Soliman M. Santos, JR
Published by: CPCS
Publication date: May 2016
ISBN: N/A

 

How do you end a protracted, seemingly intractable, conflict that has lasted for more than 40 years? And how do you do it in a context of exhaustion and disillusion?

This collection of articles by Judge Sol Santos, presents a thoughtful analysis of the peace process between the Government of the Philippines and the CPP-NPA-NDFP over the last decade. They propose alternative solutions to on-going challenges whilst highlighting the role of civil society and affected communities.

At the core of Judge Sol’s writing stand those directly affected by the conflict: those holding arms at both sides of the divide, those caught in the midst of it: the internally displaced, the wounded, the dead ones, their families, friends and comrades. As this book shows: “A peace process is easier promised than done”. However, there is a moral obligation to continue pushing for a negotiated solution. These articles call for a change of attitude among those involved in the negotiation.

The time is now.


We want Genuine Peace 26.2.16-cover smallWe Want Genuine Peace: Voices of communities from Myanmar’s ceasefire areas in 2015

Author: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Published by: CPCS
Publication date: February 2016
ISBN: 13: 978 999 63 85636

Based on 772 conversations carried out between November 2014 and March 2015 with 1,072 people living in six states which have ceasefires, We Want Genuine Peace presents community opinions about their direct experiences of living in conflict situations, their needs, challenges, as well as hopes for the future, all within the framework of the Myanmar peace process. Using CPCS Listening Methodology, people familiar with local contexts, cultures, and who spoke the same language (called listeners) were asked to travel to hard-to-reach communities in Kachin, Kayah, Kayin, Northern Shan, Southern Shan, and Mon states to converse with a cross-section of residents.

COVER SMALL We Want Genuine Peace - Burmese copyThis publication is divided into nine chapters:

Chapter 1 contains the introduction as well as the summary of all findings, both the main findings across all the states and the main findings from each state. This chapter also contains CPCS recommendations to key stakeholders based on an analysis of the findings. Chapter 2 explains what listening methodology is and how it was used to obtain the results. Chapter 3 covers the evolution of Listening Methodology as it has been applied by CPCS in peace research. Chapters 4 to 9 contain more in-depth discussions of the main themes in each of the six areas covered by the research.

Lastly, the Annex contains various tables, including the overall main themes, the uncategorized main themes from each state and a summary of the answers to guide questions in each state.

The Burmese version available at the link below is a translation of the Executive Summary.


Role of Liaison Offices - cover small jan.15-page-001Building Infrastructures for Peace: The Role of Liaison Offices in Myanmar’s Peace Process

Author: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Published by: CPCS
Publication Date: January 2016
ISBN: N/A

The importance of establishing infrastructure to sustain and promote a country’s progress towards peace has attracted growing attention as a core component of sustainable peacebuilding. The term “peace infrastructure” or “infrastructure for peace” (I4P) is used to describe interconnected structures or mechanisms that span across all levels of society to foster more strategic, sustainable and locally rooted interventions to conflict.

Liaison Offices cover small MMThis paper examines the Myanmar peace process through a framework of peace infrastructure to identify spaces to strengthen the foundation of peace in Myanmar, namely by building the capacity of liaison offices, institutions that have been established to strengthen communication and coordination between conflict parties and facilitate wider community engagement in the peace process.

Based on CPCS observations and interviews with over 100 liaison office staff, this paper provides an analysis of liaison offices in the scope of the larger peace process to provoke insights on how liaison offices can work. It concludes with a series of recommendations for providing greater support to liaison offices so they can fulfill their potential as effective structural supports of peace in Myanmar.


Karen Unity cover smallKaren Unity Building Initiatives: Towards sustainable peace in Myanmar

Author: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Published by: CPCS
Publication Date: January 2016
ISBN: N/A

In light of ongoing unity-building measures in Myanmar, Karen Unity Building Initiatives: Towards sustainable peace in Myanmar examines the Karen history of conflict, seeking to analyse the push for greater unity amongst the Karen.

Karen Burmese cover smallThe paper explores Karen opinions and experiences of unity building, derived from conversations with Karen individuals from various communities, civil society organisations (CSOs), armed groups, political parties and government offices. Karen Unity Building Initiatives also draws upon on information from conversations held with 111 community members across Karen State who shared their opinions on the current peace process in Myanmar in 2014.

These conversations formed the basis of the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies publication Listening to Communities: Karen State.


The Journey of the MILF cover small

The Journey of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front's First Ex-Combatants 

Author: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Published by: CPCS
Publication Date: December 2015
ISBN: 9789996381799

On June 16, 2015 a Ceremonial Turnover of Weapons and Decommissioning of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) combatants was held at the old Capitol Building in Sultan Kudarat, Maguindanao. On that day, 145 Bangsamoro Islamic Armed Forces (BIAF) combatants were registered and processed to formally commence their return to full civilian lives. In late July 2015, the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (CPCS) was invited by the MILF to interview 10 of these men. This publication is the result of those conversations. It brings out the voices of these 10 men who had just, a few weeks earlier, put their arms to rest. What these men’s reflections show is that decommissioning is a tool for peace; that it is not an end in itself but a means to a different life.


Making-Peace-28.09.29-page-001-213x300 (1)Making Peace in Their Own Words: People of Myanmar’s Peace Process

Author: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Published by: CPCS
Publication Date: October 2015
ISBN: 9789996381775

Published by the Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS), Making Peace in Their Own Words: People of Myanmar’s Peace Process presents an interwoven narrative of the views, origins and life experiences of key individuals from different sides of the negotiation table that have played leading roles in the peace talks.

It tells the Book_Making Peace - Burmese_for Web-page-001story of a group of people who embarked on a common journey without knowing how would it end and invites readers to accompany these peacebuilders, who, for a long time, opposed each other in their quest for a common vision.

 


Communal cover 138pThis is Not Who We Are: Listening to communities affected by communal violence in Myanmar

Author: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Published by: CPCS
Publication Date: September 2015
ISBN: n/a

Using CPCS Listening Methodology, this publication elevates community voices from six locations in Myanmar that experienced communal violence to reveal a strong alternative narrative to the one commonly heard on the issue. Conversations were held in November 2014 with 220 community members from Meiktilla, Mandalay Region; Lashio, Shan State; Mandalay, Mandalay Region; Shwebo district, Sagaing Region; West Bago, Bago Region; and Sittwe, COVER SMALL This is Not Who We Are - Burmese copyRakhine State. Community members discussed their perspectives and opinions in light of their experience of communal violence and their hopes and desires for peaceful co-existence in the future. Key topics and themes were identified to form the basis of the discussions, which were then catalogued and prioritised by the listening teams who spoke with the communities.


tatmadaw-front-page-211x300Listening to Voices – Perspectives from the Tatmadaw's rank and file

Author: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Published by: CPCS
Publication Date: July 2015
ISBN: 978996381768

This project aims to challenge the stigma that often surrounds discussions of the Tatmadaw, and listen to soldiers from their rank and file; to ask soldiers what they think about the peace process, and to listen to their perspectives, desires and challenges. Through listening to Tatmadaw soldiers, the project seeks to better understand how their experiences within the institution and being directly involved on the frontlines of conflict have shaped their opinions of peace and the peace process and to better understand their concerns and desires for the future. Listening teams went to six different regions across Myanmar, where military bases were located and found that soldiers could, and wanted to, share their opinions, experiences and stories. In total, the project listened to 67 soldiers over one month in June, 2014. This project is an attempt to look at the Tatmadaw as an institution comprised of individuals, to build awareness, share personal perspectives and highlight the diversity of the institution. It was carried out with the hope to engage the Tatmadaw more holistically in the peace process in the future.


undpStruggle for Peace: The 25 Year Journey of the ABSDF

Author: CPCS
Published by: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
Publication Date: April 2014
ISBN: 978 9 996 38171 3

Expressed through the voices of All Burma Students Democratic Front (ABSDF) members, this book tells the story of the organisation's birth from the August 8, 1988 student uprising through its 25 years of living and fighting in the remote jungle areas of the country. It provides an in-depth examination of the experiences of ABSDF members, from their time as protesting students, to revolutionaries, to their current involvement in the Myanmar peace process. From hardships caused by disease and food supplies, to the fears, hopes, joys and disappointments of young men and women trying to realise their dream of fighting against oppression, Struggle for Peace takes readers on a journey of change and transformation.


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Working Inside the Triangles: Engaging with locally led peace initiatives in Myanmar

Author: Clarke, Sarah. Translated by Dianna Lazing
Published by: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
Publication Date: April 2014
ISBN: n/a

Analysing the state of the current peace process in Myanmar, this paper looks at the role of different actors in the process and the dynamics between them to propose specific recommendations regarding strategies for engagement by international actors.



Foot SoldiersListening to Voices: Myanmar Foot Soldiers Speak

Author: CPCS
Published by: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
Publication Date: April 2014
ISBN: n/a

Analysing the peace process in Myanmar from the perspective of foot soldiers from the country's various non-state armed groups. This publication identifies the needs and concerns of foot soldiers, in moving away from armed conflict to a democratic Myanmar.


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Listening to Communities – Karen (Kayin) State

Author: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Published by: CPCS
Publication Date: November 2014
ISBN: n/a

Conversations with over 100 people from all walks of life across Karen (Kayin) State in Myanmar took place to better understand different views on the peace process and the current needs of their communities. Employing listening methodology as the primary research method, analysis pulled out common and reoccurring themes in the minds of those who participated. This publication raises their voices and draws upon the insight and wisdom of people directly affected by ongoing conflict and the Myanmar peace process.


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No failure in peace work - the life and teaching of Dekha Ibrahim Abdi
(2nd edition)

Author: Dekha's friends, family and former colleagues
Publication Date: May 2014
ISBN: 9789996381720

This book pays tribute to the great peace builder Dekha Ibrahim Abdi and is an attempt to capture her theory and practice. This is a second and enlarged edition of the book, comprising new contributions from Dekha's dear friends and colleagues.

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Widening the Table: Hybrid Support Groups in Conflict Mediation

Author: Emma Leslie
Publication Date: 17 December 2013
ISBN: n/a

Arguing that conflict is not static, Emma Leslie stresses the need to find innovative, more holistic approaches to conflict mediation. Emma reflects on her experience with the new model of hybrid support groups in conflict mediation.


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UNDP Community of Practice Conference – Keynote Address

Author: Emma Leslie
Publication Date: October 14th 2013
ISBN: n/a

Arguing that conflict in Asia is not static Emma Leslie stresses the need for peace workers to reframe analysis, frameworks and ourselves to engage effectively in peace building and conflict transformation.


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Letting the other in: conflict prevention in Myanmar

Author: Emma Leslie
Publication Date: September 2013
ISBN: n/a

In this article Emma Leslie gives an insight into the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies’ peace work in Myanmar. She discusses the importance of cultural humility and of adopting and open approach in peace work. Furthermore, she emphasises that trust is essential in order to foster relationships that allow for more effective peace practices and programs.


mindanao

Innovation in mediation support: The International Contact Group in Mindanao

Author: Kristian Herbolzheimer and Emma Leslie
Conciliation Resources, London
Publication Date: July 2013
ISBN: n/a

This paper reflects on Conciliation Resources’ experience of formal hybrid mediation support in the Mindanao peace process. Key lessons are drawn from this new approach and its potential for further use in the field of mediation and conflict transformation is evaluated.


bull-in-china-shop

Supporting Peace Processes in South East Asia: How not to be a bull in a China shop?

Author: Emma Leslie, Swiss Peace, CPCS
Publication Date: June 2013
ISBN: n/a

This summary shares some of CPCS’s Director, Emma Leslie’s, lessons learnt from third party interventions in South East Asian peace processes; highlighting useful skills and approaches while touching on potential pitfalls in this setting.


gph-milf

Embedding Feedback Mechanisms: Bringing Voices from the Ground to the GPH-MILF Peace Talks

Author: Elizabeth M. Padilla
Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
Publication Date: November 2011
ISBN: n/a

Researched and authored by CPCS staff Elisabeth Padilla, this publication attempts to develop and integrate a mechanism to feedback the voices of victims of violence at the local level to the higher level discussions.


Ethnic_People_Speak-1-coverListening to Voices from Inside: Ethnic People Speak

Author: CPCS, Siem Reap
Publication Date: June 2010
ISBN: 9789995091958

Using the listening research methodology, this publication seeks to amplify the unheard voices of ethnic people living inside Myanmar, aiming to provide a better understanding of their situation and most pressing needs.


nargis

Listening to Voices from Inside: Myanmar Civil Society Response to Cyclone Nargis

Author: CPCS, Siem Reap
Publication Date: July 2009
ISBN: n/a

This is the first in a series of publications which raise the voices of people from inside Myanmar. This paper focuses on the civil society response to Cyclone Nargis concluding that despite the political situation at the time there was still space for a dynamic, varied and active civil society to operate in Myanmar.


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Learning world views among ethnic groups: Using the Peace Counts Tour for peace education and conflict transformation

Author: Leban Serto
Published by: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
Publication Date: April 2014
ISBN: n/a

This paper explores the easing of tensions between ethnic groups by exposing ethnic leaders to the narratives of others, emphasising traditional and modern conflict resolution methods for transforming violent conflict in participants' home contexts.


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Identity Considerations for Elicitive Conflict Transformation

Author: Taylor, Noah
Published by: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
Publication Date: February 2014
ISBN: n/a

One of the most recent developments in the practice of conflict transformation is the systemic approach dubbed “Elicitive Conflict Transformation.” As a practice, it is deeply tied to considerations of identity. This paper summarizes and synthesizes current thinking in the transrational approach to conflict transformation as the current state-of-the-art in peace theory. This approach underlies the practice of Elicitive Conflict Transformation and opens many new frontiers to peace research including an expanded perspective of what identity is and how it shapes the work of conflict transformation.


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Perspectives of the Subanen Tribe on the New Bangsamoro Political Entity

Published by: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
Publication Date: February 2014
ISBN: n/a

This paper seeks to identify the perspective of the Subanen, one of Mindanao’s non-Muslim indigenous tribes, towards the New Bangsamoro Political Entity (NPBE). The research helps to provide a better understanding of the Subanen view on the NPBE, clarifies the concerns of the tribe and details specific policy recommendations.


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Transforming Ethnic Conflicts in Manipur through Ningol Chakouba

Author: Meitei Rajkumar, Bobichand and Longjam,Surekha
Published by: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
Publication Date: February 2014
ISBN: n/a

Presented at the 2013 Peace Practitioners Research Conference, the objective of this action research is to examine the impact and scope of the emerging role of Ningol Chakkouba in achieving more conscious inter-ethnic relationships in Manipur, finding constructive ways for building peace between divided communities.


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Autonomous District Councils as a Tool for Diversity Management

Author: Goswami Vernal, Triveni
Published by: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
Publication Date: January 2014
ISBN: n/a

This paper was presented at the 2013 Peace Practitioners' Research Conference in the seminar "State Responses to Opportunities and Challenges of Diversity". The research analyses the functioning of Autonomous District Councils as a tool for Diversity Management in Northeast India. The findings of the research provide an opportunity to reflect upon the feasibility of the ADCs for political change and successful 'management' of diversity.


timor

From Street Fighters to Peace Builders: The Stories of Transformation in Timor Leste’s Martial Arts leaders

Author: CPCS, Siem Reap
Publication Date: August 2010
ISBN: n/a

This book documents peacebuilding activities from a number of international organisations working in Timor Leste following its struggle for independence. More specifically it follows the successes and challenges of a training programme aimed at transforming martial arts leaders from agents within a culture of violence, to agents of peace.


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Listening Project: Field Visit Report Myanmar/Burma

Author: Collaborative Learning Projects
Published by: CPCS and Shalom Foundation
Publication Date: 2009
ISBN: n/a

This publication discusses the findings of a listening project that Shalom Foundation of Myanmar and the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies undertook in Myanmar in 2009. The Listening Project sought the reflections of experienced and thoughtful people occupying a range of positions within Myanmar to assess the impact of aid efforts by various international actors.


sri-lanka

Sri Lanka: Conflict mitigation through community-based water resource management

Author: Dilshan Annaraj
CPCS, Siem Reap
Publication Date: 2012
ISBN: n/a

In reference to Sri Lanka’s tea plantation communities this paper identifies water disputes as a root cause of violence and recommends community based water resource management system to mitigate conflicts within these communities.


Manoj_book_update_05.06-cover

Identifying Effective Measures to Combat Organised Crime in Post – Conflict Nepal

Author: Manoj Kumar, Nepal
Publication Date: June 2013
ISBN: n/a

This paper analyses the reasons for the dramatic increase in organized crime in Kathmandu after the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement and identifies effective measures to combat such crime.


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Resolving Conflict in Muslim Mindanao: Showcasing Four Traditional Methods

Author: Datumanong, Abubakar; Pigkaulan, Parido Rahman; Makalingkang, Maguid; Uka-Lingga, Juwairiya
Institute of Bangsamoro Studies, Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
Publication Date: November 2013
ISBN: 9789996381706

Showcasing different traditional dispute resolution mechanisms from Mindanao, this publication attests to the contribution of local populations in working towards peaceful societies, and the inherent value of embracing and incorporating indigenous structures and mechanisms into formal practices.


national-apologies

National Apologies: Mapping the complexities of validity

Author: Eneko Sanz
CPCS, Siem Reap
Publication Date: April 2012
ISBN: n/a

This mapping exercise seeks to provide a better understanding of national apologies by analysing the nuances associated with the term while studying examples of apologies made by states to their people.


peace-building

The peacebuilding story: A narrative policy analysis of strategic planning frameworks for international post-conflict peacebuilding

Author: Eneko Sanz, Spain
Publication Date: July 2013
ISBN: n/a

Encouraging practitioners to question and challenge narratives around strategic peace building frameworks this research critically analyses such narratives and shows that they tend to be subjective in nature, signal certain political positions and are often framed through the lens of modernist state-building theory.


conflicting-peaces

Conflicting Peaces: Engaging with Diversities in Friction

Author: Florencia Benitez-Schaefer, Shawn Bryant, Catalina Vallejo, and Noah Taylor
The International Journal of Community Diversity, Illinois USA
Publication Date: 2013
ISBN: 2327-0004

Co-authored by CPCS Academic Director Noah Taylor, this conceptual paper explores the diversity of perspectives on peace moving beyond the idea of peace in relation to the absence of conflict and the presence of security. In this framework peace is explored as impure, diverse and conflictive, advocating for an understanding of peace that embraces diversity, and engages with conflict rather than suppresses it.


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Action Research Results: ACTS Course Graduates 2011

Author: ACTS Graduates
Published by: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
Publication Date: 2012
ISBN: n/a

This publications showcases final short papers from 2011 graduates of CPCS’ Applied Conflict Transformation Master’s Course that we offer in cooperation with the Pannasastra University in Phnom Penh.



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2010 Myanmar Election Observer Report

Publication Date: April 2011
ISBN: n/a

This observation report provides an independent view of the 2010 elections, based on observations of people who were on the ground in many different parts of the country.


 

 

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